The art of floristry flourished last year amid the popularity of period dramas such as Downton Abbey and Bridgerton.

The number of Britons learning the skill rose 50 per cent, according to the National Association of Flower Arrangement Societies (NAFAS), with experts also attributing the increase to people spending more time in their homes due to Covid restrictions.

There are now 5,000 flower-arranging societies across the UK, with many saying they have waiting lists for their courses.

The number of Britons learning the skill rose 50 per cent, according to the National Association of Flower Arrangement Societies (NAFAS), with experts also attributing the increase to people spending more time in their homes due to Covid restrictions

The number of Britons learning the skill rose 50 per cent, according to the National Association of Flower Arrangement Societies (NAFAS), with experts also attributing the increase to people spending more time in their homes due to Covid restrictions

The number of Britons learning the skill rose 50 per cent, according to the National Association of Flower Arrangement Societies (NAFAS), with experts also attributing the increase to people spending more time in their homes due to Covid restrictions

Hannah Tipper, 38, a science teacher from Cheltenham, began flower arranging last term because 'the pressure of teaching during lockdown and home learning for the children made me realise I needed another outlet' (File image)

Hannah Tipper, 38, a science teacher from Cheltenham, began flower arranging last term because 'the pressure of teaching during lockdown and home learning for the children made me realise I needed another outlet' (File image)

Hannah Tipper, 38, a science teacher from Cheltenham, began flower arranging last term because ‘the pressure of teaching during lockdown and home learning for the children made me realise I needed another outlet’ (File image)

The art of floristry flourished last year amid the popularity of period dramas such as Downton Abbey (pictured) and Bridgerton

The art of floristry flourished last year amid the popularity of period dramas such as Downton Abbey (pictured) and Bridgerton

The art of floristry flourished last year amid the popularity of period dramas such as Downton Abbey (pictured) and Bridgerton

Katherine Kear, chairman of the NAFAS, said: ‘People looked for new hobbies during lockdown. Most people don’t do any art and craft after they leave school but suddenly people had time for creativity. 

‘There is huge interest in gardening, and flower arranging is often seen as an extension of that.’

Hannah Tipper, 38, a science teacher from Cheltenham, began flower arranging last term because ‘the pressure of teaching during lockdown and home learning for the children made me realise I needed another outlet’.

The mother of two said she had also been inspired by TV period dramas, adding: ‘It is such a relaxing and peaceful hobby. You feel great creating something yourself. People take flowers too much for granted.’

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